Student Internships

Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Ecology

South Texas Summer Research Technician

Location: This position is based at the San Antonio Viejo Ranch, 45 minutes south of Hebbronville, and will include work on the East Foundation’s properties in South Texas.
Website: http://www.eastfoundation.net/
Start Date: 05/15/2017
Salary: Compensation is $10 per hour and includes housing on the San Antonio Viejo Ranch.

Summer Field Technician Positions - Vegetation

Location: South Texas (nearest towns is Hebbronville)
Start date: ~15 May 2017 - (negotiable)
Salary: $2,000/month plus housing
Agency: Institute of Renewable Natural Resources, Texas A&M University
Website: http://irnr.tamu.edu/
Contact Person: Jeremy Baumgardt
Email: Baumgardt@tamu.edu

The East Foundation is currently conducting the largest grazing experiment in Texas (http://www.eastfoundation.net/program/priorities/research/las-coloraditas-grazing-research-and-demonstration-area/) and we are monitoring the impacts on vertebrates and vegetation. We are currently hiring 2 crew members to collect data on the vegetation. These positions will begin around 15 May and continue through the end of June.

Clemson University’s Youth Learning Institute Camp Wildlife Counselor

The camp is located on YLI’s Camp Bob Cooper directly on Lake Marion (South Carolina’s largest lake). A majority of the camp week will focus on hunting and fishing techniques, wildlife ecology, ATV riding, outdoor survival skills, shotgun training, rifle training, and archery training. Instructors will be trained and certified in these areas. In addition to these activities we will also utilize other components such as swimming, team courses, night hikes and sporting clays. Our Advanced camp offers enhanced hunting skills and game calling at Back Woods Quail Club. You can take a look at our camp by going to our website.

If you are interested in the position please send your resume and three professional references to Candice Heatherly at ceharpe@clemson.edu

Western Canada Cooperative Preseason Waterfowl Banding Program

Banding is a form of marking that involves the attachment of a metallic ring (i.e., band) to the legs of waterfowl. Each band has an imprinted unique code that is used to identify individual banded birds and their recovery records. Successful waterfowl banding programs have provided critical information for waterfowl conservation and management, leading to reliable knowledge of waterfowl ecology, behavior, and population dynamics. In particular, banding and band encounter reports, primarily from hunters, allow waterfowl managers to estimate harvest rates, survival rates, and assess movements and the structure of populations. The importance of these data to waterfowl management has increased with the formal use of predictive models which inform decision making through adaptive management protocols. Banding data is most useful when it is derived through a large-scale, coordinated effort with proper scientific rigor and careful consideration of monitoring designs related to specific research or management needs. The North American waterfowl banding program has been a joint responsibility of the U.S. and Canadian governments since 1920, and the Western Cooperative Waterfowl Banding Program is a critical component of this partnership.

A banding assignment typically lasts about 3 1/2 weeks in August, start and end times are normally 3-5 August to 28-30 August and do not include the travel to/from Canada which can add up to 3 or 4 days to both ends of a trip. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service operates banding stations in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and the Northwest Territories. Banding participants are, at times, required to work 10-14 hour days in the field, 7 days a week. Physical activity is required, including lifting and carrying grain bags of 30-40lbs, wire, and other banding equipment to traps sites. Wearing hip boots and walking short distances in water and mud is necessary. On the job training in banding techniques, waterfowl speciation, and sex and age determination will be provided. While helpful and desirable, no prior banding or waterfowl experience is necessary.

A passport is required for this assignment, if you are a Government employee an official passport is required, other participants will need a tourist passport or passport card. Canada has strict entry requirements, past criminal or drunken driving convictions can be grounds for barring entry into the country.

This assignment allows participants to learn in depth how to trap, identify, sex, age and band waterfowl and, depending on the individuals past experiences and where the individual is assigned may provide the practical knowledge to operate a banding station in the future. If the individual is assigned to an airboat station, they may be able to fulfill their 40 hour requirement for operating an airboat with a qualified operator.

The participant will have all travel expenses paid for by the Division of Migratory Bird Management.

BLM, Las Cruces District Office: Fishery Intern

LCDO has been approved to bring on a Fishery Intern this summer. The intern would apply through any or all of the following partner organizations: GSA-Geological Society Association, ACE-American, Conservation Experience, SUU-Southern Utah University, GYF-Greening Youth Foundation, EFTA-Environment for the Americas, INROADS, HACU-Hispanic Association of Colleges & Universities, and MANRRS-Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources & Related Sciences.

Contact Info: Jack Barnitz- Supervisory Natural Resource Specialist:BLM, Las Cruces District 575-525-4310

HACU National Internship

The HACU National Internship Program (HNIP) is seeking applicants for paid summer and fall 2017 Internships. The program will match a student's career interests, educational background and previous work or volunteer experience. Students will receive paid round-trip airfare, housing arrangement assistance, emergency medical insurance, a weekly stipend, and most attend an intern orientation in Washington, D.C. Deadline for Summer internship is February 15, 2017. Although they are also excepting fall applications now; Deadline for Fall Internship is June 9,2017.

Apply at hacu.net/hacu/HNIP.asp. For questions contact: 202-467-0893 hnip@hacu.net.


Family and Consumer Sciences

Family and Consumer Sciences Internship Manual (4 out of 5 majors)

In the department field experience manual, it has forms for students and their onsite supervisor to develop the training plan objectives that will be accomplished during the field experience, with specific activities and strategies for each objective.  Students also keep a daily log of activities and a weekly log of hours worked.  The onsite supervisor completes a midterm and final evaluation of each student.

Family and Consumer Sciences Internships for Food Science and Technology

Students in this major work in our ACES in the Hole student-run manufacturing company to produce gelato and baked goods for sale in our Sam Steel Café and other businesses in town.

*Note: Students enrolled in FCS 424, FCSE 448, or HNDS 401/407 meet as a class each week in addition to the hours worked at their site. 


Plant and Environmental Sciences

Horticultural Internship Opportunities for Undergrads

The American Floral Endowment
  • Application Dateline: 05/01/2017
  • Department Contact Person: Dr. G.A. Picchioni, E-mail: gpicchio@nmsu.edu

The American Floral Endowment is offering two internship opportunities, one at a commercial greenhouse or nursery production facility (Vic and Margaret Ball Internship) and the other at a retail flower shop/wholesaler/allied trade organization (Mosmiller Internship). website

Environmental Science Internship

ES 391

  • Application Dateline: Flexible
  • Department Contact Person: Dr. April Ulery, E-mail: aulery@nmsu.edu

ES 391 is a requirement for the BS in Environmental Science. You must see your advisor before you make arrangements to participate in an internship. It is YOUR responsibility to register for ES 391 either during the summer session or a subsequent semester in order to get credit

Soil Science Internship

SOIL 391

  • Application Dateline: Flexible
  • Department Contact Person: Dr. April Ulery, E-mail: aulery@nmsu.edu

SOIL 391 is a requirement for the BS in Soil Science. You must see your advisor before you make arrangements to participate in an internship. It is YOUR responsibility to register for SOIL 391. The requirements for the student, the academic advisor, and the internship host are enclosed in the document bellow. All have responsibilities for the successful completion of the internship.

Turfgrass Internships

HORT 391

  • Application Dateline: Flexible
  • Department Contact Person: Dr. Ryan Goss, E-mail: ryangoss@nmsu.edu

Fox Chapel Golf Club

  • Application Dateline: TBA
  • Department Contact Person: Dr. Ryan Goss, E-mail: ryangoss@nmsu.edu

Student Trainee (Soil Conservation), GS-0499-02

Natural Resources Conservation Service

  • 1 vacancy - Bay City, TX
  • 1 vacancy - Bryan, TX
  • 1 vacancy - Crosbyton, TX
  • 1 vacancy - Granbury, TX
  • 1 vacancy - Meridian, TX
  • 1 vacancy - Midland, TX
  • 1 vacancy - Nacogdoches, TX
  • 1 vacancy - Quanah, TX
  • 1 vacancy - San Marcos, TX
  • 1 vacancy - Uvalde, TX

Work Schedule is Full-Time - Internships

Opened Thursday 3/23/2017 Closes Monday 4/3/2017

  • Salary Range $11.48 to $14.45 / Per Hour
  • Series & Grade GS-0499-02/02
  • Promotion Potential 04
  • Supervisory Status No
  • Who May Apply--Students who are currently enrolled or accepted for enrollment on at least a half-time basis at a qualifying educational institution in a certificate, degree, or diploma program.
  • Control Number 466413100
  • Job Announcement Number NRCS-17-0582-PW-MG
  • Corresponding Link: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/466457700/

Entomology, Plant Pathology & Weed Science

School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management

All HRTM students are required to complete a 400-hour internship for academic credit, typically between their junior and senior year. This is in addition to 400 hours of practical work experience (non-credit) which may be completed at any time. 

The academic credit is awarded through a sequence of three one-credit classes.  HRTM 307 - Professional Development is designed to prepare students for the internship and is graded on a pass-fail passes. Students take HRTM 408 - Hospitality Internship while performing the internship with the majority of the assessment based on feedback from their supervisor. While performing the internship, they should also be preparing for the assignments required in HRTM 409 - Internship Seminar. That class is designed so that students critically analyze their internship and also get to learn about their fellow students' internship experience. 

The School of HRTM provides assistance in locating practical work experience and internships by sending notice of employment opportunities postings through our HRTM listserv and Monday announcements.  We hold a the annual Hospitality Career Fair in February which is open only to HRTM majors, minors, and students taking specific HRTM classes. Typical industry participants include Marriott International, Hyatt Regency Tamaya, Jason's Deli, Red Lobster, National Distributing Company, Enterprise, Pappas Restaurants, Hotel Encanto, Red River Ski Area and many more.  Information about the Career Fair can be found at http://aces.nmsu.edu/academics/shrtm/career-fair.html

Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Business

HACU National Internship

The HACU National Internship Program (HNIP) is seeking applicants for paid summer and fall 2017 Internships. The program will match a student's career interests, educational background and previous work or volunteer experience. Students will receive paid round-trip airfare, housing arrangement assistance, emergency medical insurance, a weekly stipend, and most attend an intern orientation in Washington, D.C. Deadline for Summer internship is February 15, 2017. Although they are also excepting fall applications now; Deadline for Fall Internship is June 9,2017.

Apply at hacu.net/hacu/HNIP.asp. For questions contact: 202-467-0893 hnip@hacu.net.

Animal & Range Sciences

2017 Range Ecology Technicians Juniper Woodland and Shrub Steppe Ecology

Job Title: Range Ecology Technician
Start Date: May/June, 2017
End Date: August/Sept, 2017; 10 to 12 weeks of employment
Location: Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center, Burns, Oregon.
Techs work with the research scientist. Fieldwork is oriented to ecological studies with emphasis in plant succession, plant community structure and composition, and post-fire ecology. Responsibilities are to assist in the collection of field data (vegetation and soils descriptions). Field work takes up about 80% of the position responsibilities. Work is in rugged and remote areas of southeastern Oregon and southwest Idaho. Office work is mainly data entry. Laboratory work consists of biomass separation and weighing, seed cleaning and weighing, and preparation of soils for analysis.

Contact: Corresponding document: 2017 Range Ecology Technicians
Dr. Jon Bates
EOARC-Burns
67826-A Hwy 205,
Burns, OR 97720
E-mail: jon.bates@oregonstate.edu
Phone: 541-573-8932
Website: http://oregonstate.edu/dept/EOARC

Co-op/Internship

$12/hr - Housing/Utilities Provided
Do you want to live on a working ranch?
Do you want to learn more about grazing livestock research?
Do you need to save some money to finish your degree?
Working research ranch Cooperative Educational Experience located in Central New Mexico east of the Village of Corona. Housing is provided 12 miles east of Corona in a picturesque setting of rolling grassland with mountains and mesas to the west and the horizon to the east. Student will provide support to staff while offering a diverse experience in the field of range livestock management and research. A dynamic offering can be tailored to meet the successful applicants interest or needs, while giving a broad spectrum of experience in cattle, sheep, goat and wildlife management, range monitoring and management, weed and brush, habitat improvement, rangeland and production economics, agricultural education and outreach, range land research, general ranch maintenance and improvements, as well as other areas not described.
Contact:
Shad Cox
575-799-3569
shadcox@nmsu.edu

Western Dairy Transport (WDT)

Western Dairy Transport (WDT) is an integrated dairy transportation service provider serving Eastern New Mexico, the Texas Panhandle, and throughout the United States.  We are seeking individuals interested in immediate internships in process and operations management to serve our shippers and customers in Northeastern New Mexico and the Texas Panhandle.

Internships will be awarded based on industry knowledge, experience, and ability to work closely with our management team and vehicle operators.  This is an internship with opportunity for career placement within WDT for qualified individuals.  Both full and part time internships will be considered based on the applicants location and class schedules.  Recent graduates and completion of 90+ hour students are welcomed to apply.

All interested and qualified applicants are welcomed to apply by submitting a cover letter and resume via email to dashelton@wdtmilk.com.  Please indicate your willingness to relocate to the Portales/Clovis geographic area and your work hour availability in your cover letter.  No initial phone correspondence will be considered.

We offer the students Internship opportunity through the EPWS Internship course 390. The student works under the supervision of the a EPPWS faculty member. The student interested to enroll in the class would speak with a department advisor to obtain consent for registration.

Students are always welcome to join our EPPWS team for volunteer opportunities to prepare and participate at both college and departmental events.

For more information visit the website at eppws.nmsu.edu Or send an email to eppwsdep@nmsu.edu