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Jinfa Zhang

Jinfa Zhang
Image of Jinfa Zhang

Research area: Cotton Breeding, Genetics and Genomics

Education:

Ph.D.: Plant Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of Arkansas

Agron. D.: Plant Genetics and Breeding, Central China Agricultural University

M.S.: Plant Genetics and Breeding, Central China Agricultural University

B.S.: Central China Agricultural University at Jinzhou

Professional Experience:

2014 - Present: Professor, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, New Mexico State University

2007 - 2014: Associate Professor, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, New Mexico State University

2002 - 2007: Assistant Professor, Department of Plant and Environmental Science, New Mexico State University

2001 - 2002: Cotton Molecular Breeder, Cotton Technology Team, Monsanto Company

2000 - 2001: Research Associate, Department of Biology, McGill University

1999 - 2000: Research Associate, Department of Agronomy, University of Arkansas

1996 - 1999: Senior Research Assistant, Department of Agronomy, University of Arkansas

1995 - 1996: Visiting Scientist, Department of Agronomy, University of Arkansas

1992 - 1998: Associate Professor, Department of Agronomy, Central China Agricultural University

1987 - 1992: Assistant Professor, Department of Agronomy, Central China Agricultural University

1985 - 1987: Instructor, Department of Agronomy, Central China Agricultural University

Research Interests:

The Cotton Breeding , Genetics and Genomics Program at New Mexico State University has a history of 75 years in developing Acala cotton germplasm and cultivars with high fiber quality and Verticillium wilt tolerance. Our research continues in that tradition, with emphasis on developing high fiber quality and high yielding Acala cultivars, and incorporating high levels of resistance to pink bollworm, bollworm, herbicides, Verticillium wilt, and root-knot nematodes in Acala and Pima cotton for New Mexico and the southwest region. We are continuing to work on developing a practical hybrid cotton seed production system based on cytoplasmic male sterility and a haploid-producing system based on semigamy. Tools in quantitative, qualitative and molecular genetics are integrated into our breeding program. A significant portion of our effort involves developing functional molecular markers and identifying genes or quantitative trait loci ( QTLs ) for fiber quality, yield, agronomic traits, male fertility restoration, insect, disease and nematode resistance, and drought and salt tolerance in order to develop efficient marker-assisted selection strategies. Molecular mapping, physical mapping, candidate gene approach, and gene expression profiling are combined to locate and isolate candidate genes or QTLs of agronomic importance. Breeding for glandless cotton as a triple purpose (fiber, food, and feed) crop has become increasingly important in the program.

I teach Molecular Analysis of Complex Traits (AGRO/HORT 516), Genetics and Society (AGRO 303G), and Genetic Techniques Laboratory (GENE 305L). I am a member of both the Plant and Environmental Sciences graduate faculty and Molecular Biology Graduate Program faculty.

I currently serve as an editor or associate editor, or on the editorial board for the following journals: The Crop Journal; Journal of Cotton Science (National Cotton Council, US); Cotton Science (China Cotton Society); Molecular and Genetic Genomics; BMC Genomics; International Journal of Genomics; and PLOS ONE.