Agronomy

On August 15, 1999, Mick O'Neill, Assistant Professor became the second agronomist conducting research for NMSU's ASC at Farmington, NM site. The Center's focus became agricultural solutions for the semi-arid environment, of the Four Corners region.

Research findings from agronomic crop research can be reviewed via Projects and Results, on NMSU's Agricultural Science Center's website.

BioEnergy

Considering the importance of the energy industry in the Four Corners region, research in renewable forms, including solar, wind, and biomass energy, are increasingly crucial to long-term economic viability on regional, national, and global levels.

The New Mexico legislature recently mandated public power providers in the state to increase their utilization of renewable energy sources on an incremental basis up to 15% by 2015, then up to 20% by 2020. The Agricultural Science Center at Farmington addresses this goal through research related to biomass for energy production and oilseed crops used in biodiesel production.

Winter Canola

Canola is a potential oil seed for crop production in Northwestern New Mexico. The Winter Canola Variety Trial is a testing program to help determine which entries will perform best, within various test sites throughout the United States. The trial results are compiled by Kansas State University. NMSU's Agricultural Science Center - Farmington is one of the variety trial sites. Results in PDF files have been presented for your convenience.

Variety Trials

The New Mexico State University's Agricultural Science Center at Farmington and the Cooperative Extension Service, in San Juan County, have been and will continue to be the major field crop research and dissemination sources in northwestern New Mexico and the Four Corners region. The Agricultural Science Center at Farmington has furnished adaptive research information that has contributed to increased crop productivity and profitability, in the area. Extension agents, in all four states bordering the region, have used research results published by faculty and staff from the Agricultural Science Center, for dissemination and education.

The agricultural industry in northwestern New Mexico is critical to San Juan County and the rest of the state. As newly irrigated cropland is developed for the area each year, the demand for information on the adaptation of new crops for the area will increase. The search for new varieties and hybrids, of currently important crops, will also be important. Adaptive crop research has made and will continue to make a significant contribution to the success of agriculture in the state, region, and nation. This project is designed to evaluate varieties and hybrids of field crops for production in northwestern New Mexico. This includes the evaluation of cultural practices, such as crop variety selection, planting dates, plant population and soil fertility.