Strategic Planning
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College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

2000 Strategic Plan

Contents


Agriculture is the service of producing, distributing, marketing, and consuming food and fiber.

The agricultural sector includes:

  • Production of agricultural commodities
  • Processing and distribution of agricultural products
  • Supply and service functions with agricultural inputs
  • Use, conservation, development, and management of air, land, and water resources
  • Development and maintenance of rural recreational and aesthetic resources
  • Related economic, sociological, political, environmental, and behavioral functions

Home economics concerns the production and dissemination of scholarly information in the areas of human development, family relations, clothing, textiles, fashion merchandising, food science and technology, human nutrition, and family resource management.

Land-Grant Colleges

The history of land-grant colleges of agriculture is intertwined with the history of higher education for U.S. citizens of ordinary means. The land-grant system began in 1862 with the Morrill Act. This law gave states public lands provided the lands be sold or used for profit and the proceeds used to establish at least one college–hence, land-grant colleges–that would teach agriculture and the mechanical arts. Land grants for the establishment of colleges of agriculture and mechanical arts were also later given to U.S. territories and the District of Columbia. The legislative mandate for these land-grant colleges helped extend higher education to broad segments of the U.S. population. Legislation in 1890 and 1994 created other land-grant colleges around the country, historically Black colleges and Native American colleges, respectively.

The 1862 Morrill Act gave the land-grant colleges their mandate to teach. The colleges acquired a research function in 1887 through the Hatch Act, which recognized the need for original research to support the teaching of agriculture and help develop agricultural innovations. The legislation funded a system of state agricultural experiment stations, most of which were established under the direction of the 1862 land-grant colleges. Faculty with Agricultural Experiment Station appointments have potential access to "Hatch" research funds, which are administered by the USDA and distributed to the state agricultural experiment stations according to a formula based on population and number of farms and ranches.

With the 1914 Smith-Lever Act, the colleges took on a third function, called "extension," which was designed to disseminate knowledge generated by agricultural research at land-grant colleges beyond the campus to farms and consumers. Extension was to be a cooperative activity between the federal government (through the USDA) and the states (through the land-grant colleges). County governments, through a network of county extension agents, soon became cooperative extension partners.

Mission

The College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences at New Mexico State University is the land-grant college that provides comprehensive programs to New Mexicans in agriculture, family and consumer sciences, natural resources, and hospitality and tourism industries. These programs are delivered through statewide, integrated efforts in teaching, research, and extension.

About the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

The College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences implements the land-grant mission in New Mexico. As the core component of New Mexico’s land-grant institution, New Mexico State University (NMSU), the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences contributes to the well-being of New Mexico’s citizens and to the economic vitality of the state.

The College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences consists of three major units–Academic Programs, the Agricultural Experiment Station, and the Cooperative Extension Service–and two important College-wide support services–the Department of Agricultural Communications and the Office of Business and Resource Planning. These units encompass the activities of the College’s academic departments, nonacademic departments, agricultural science and research centers, extension program departments, and county extension offices.

Distinctive Features

The College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences differs in several important respects from other colleges of New Mexico State University. The College receives appropriations through a three-way partnership with federal, state, and local governments. The research and extension arms of the College are funded through a federal system and, on the state level, as separate line items within the NMSU budget. Partnerships with every New Mexico county result from county government contributions to extension programs.

The College also maintains close ties with agriculture, home economics, rural and urban industry leaders, members of state and federal agencies, and the general public through advisory committees that help guide academic research and extension programs. The College has evolved into a New Mexico public research and development organization, maintaining a strong commitment to conduct fundamental, applied, and mission-oriented research and to disseminate the results to the public.

Because research and extension are major, integral parts of faculty responsibilities, most faculty members are employed on a 12-month contract, rather than the 9-month academic appointment common in the rest of the University. Many faculty and staff are assigned to off-campus research facilities, extension offices, and agricultural science centers where they can effectively address the College’s statewide mission.

The College also conducts the traditional education functions of other NMSU colleges. The Academic Programs unit is enriched by the participation of the other two major College units, so learning opportunities are not limited to the classroom.

Academic Programs

Academic Programs provides leadership for the College’s academic instruction. Its primary mission is to prepare educated professionals for leadership roles in all facets of the food and fiber industries and natural resource management, as well as professionals who contribute to the well-being of New Mexico’s citizens.

Students have the opportunity to practice critical thinking, work in group environments, and learn to communicate effectively. Graduate education, which includes research, is a link between Academic Programs and the Agricultural Experiment Station.

Agricultural Experiment Station

The Agricultural Experiment Station is the research arm of the College. The Agricultural Experiment Station interacts with all academic and extension departments of the College by supporting the fundamental and applied research programs of the College faculty and graduate students. The Agricultural Experiment Station also cooperates with other research units at NMSU and with various state and federal agencies to provide opportunities for research that will benefit New Mexico’s citizens.

The Agricultural Experiment Station is made up of scientists on the main campus and at agricultural science centers and research centers throughout New Mexico. The off-campus centers support fundamental and applied research under New Mexico’s varied environmental conditions to meet the agricultural and natural resource management needs of communities in every part of the state.

Cooperative Extension Service

The Cooperative Extension Service performs the organized service function of the land-grant institution by providing the state and community-based outreach and educational activities of the College. Its mission is to supply the people of New Mexico with research-based knowledge and programs, such as 4-H and youth development, to improve their quality of life.

The Cooperative Extension Service is a partnership between federal, state, county, and local community governments; each partner contributes financial support to extension programs. All Cooperative Extension Service personnel, including county agents and state specialists, are faculty and staff of NMSU.

Some Cooperative Extension Service faculty hold joint appointments in the Agricultural Experiment Station and Academic Programs, strengthening cooperation and collaboration among the units. All college faculty, including state and county faculty, work closely together to bring research-based information to the people of New Mexico in communities where they live and work.

Department of Agricultural Communications

The Department of Agricultural Communications is funded by the Cooperative Extension Service and the Agricultural Experiment Station to support the mission of the College. The department works with faculty and outside funders to develop educational and scholarly communication packages through a wide range of communications media. Primary emphasis is to maintain consistent information channels to College clientele in New Mexico. Specifically, the department produces print, audio, video, web, and multimedia products distributed directly, through faculty and staff, and through media outlets.

Office of Business and Resource Planning

The Office of Business and Resource Planning coordinates College fiscal activities with NMSU administrative offices. The Office of Business and Resource Planning is responsible for coordinating the pre-award activities for all accounts in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences , provides guidance to faculty and staff on pre-award contract issues, and coordinates all post-award activities, including billing, reporting, and closing of completed grant and contract accounts.

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Recommendations for Future Directions

Priorities in five broad, mission-related areas and three College-wide mission-supporting areas have been identified. Each priority area involves activities of the three units of the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences : Academic Programs, Agricultural Experiment Station, and Cooperative Extension Service. The mission-related priority areas are:

  • Agricultural competitiveness

  • Economic and community development

  • Environmental issues and natural resource management

  • Quality of life for the people of New Mexico

  • Multistate, regional, and international involvement

These priorities guide the formulation of curricular directions, the development of research themes, and the organization of extension programs. Most intersect several departments and units in the College. Existing programs of high value to specific groups continue, but the focus will be on priority program areas. These mission-related priorities address the mission-oriented goals of the NMSU Strategic Directions.

The following College-wide mission-supporting pursuits, in alphabetical order, are designed to enhance the effectiveness of all College programs:

  • Image and visibility of the College

  • Increased level of support

  • Increased student and employer satisfaction with the College’s academic programs

All of the above are essential for the College to prosper and accomplish its mission.

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Mission-Related Priorities for the Future

The five mission-related priority areas for the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences and the strategies to achieve these goals are described below.

Foster technological innovation and technology transfer to enhance competitiveness of New Mexico agriculture while maintaining the natural resource base

New Mexico agriculture must remain competitive in U.S. and world markets. This requires a continuous flow of appropriate technology addressing local needs within New Mexico. It is critical that the College maintains and strengthens programs that address these needs. The College recognizes that agricultural competitiveness and efficiency should take into account social and environmental costs. Determining these factors requires a coordinated, team approach within the College.

Water is the most important limiting resource for New Mexico. All aspects of water use affect agricultural efficiency and profitability. Good water quality and availability are critical for all agricultural and nonagricultural uses. Water management will become more critical as water demands for urbanization and industrialization increase. Consequently, it is crucial for research, extension, and teaching programs to generate technological innovation and technology transfer from the College to the public that enhances agricultural profitability as it relates to water.

Agricultural needs are complex and can best be addressed by teams employing expertise from various disciplines, including both research and extension. Long-term, viable agriculture is dependent on sustainable systems and environmental safety.

More than 70 percent of New Mexico agricultural gross receipts are livestock related. Forage conversion by livestock into meat, milk, wool, and hair products continues to be a principal economic use of rangeland. Research, extension, and teaching programs on grazing and animal production are essential. Multiple-use concerns associated with economic uses of rangelands continue to be an important component of these programs.

New and improved plant varieties are a highly visible result of agricultural research. Plant breeding should be complemented with research in molecular biology. Together, these two fields can make major contributions to agriculture through the development of new genetic material for plant and animal production.

Uses of agricultural chemicals and other technologies and how they affect food safety and environmental quality are becoming more acute problems. Research on new approaches to integrated pest management, waste management, and remediation of disturbed land and polluted waters is a continuing critical need.

Objectives

  • Encourage and reward interdisciplinary and integrated management approaches in planning and implementing research and extension programs, emphasizing both applied and fundamental methods for developing comprehensive solutions to important issues.

  • Conduct research, teaching, and extension programs on emerging critical issues, including:

    • water-related research, teaching, and extension programs that generate technological innovation and transfer to enhance agricultural competitiveness and maintenance of water quality

    • programs in molecular biology, nutritional toxicology, and microbiology

    • value-added programs in food processing, marketing, and food technology

    • new economically viable uses for various plant and animal species

  • Continue to improve and strengthen current research and extension programs in:

    • animal and range management

    • plant science, with significant emphasis on genetic improvement of crop plants

    • integrated approaches to pest management that combine cultural and biological approaches with stringent use of pesticides

    • strategies to market products more efficiently and profitably

    • urban horticulture programs to assist in small agricultural efforts, gardens, landscaping, and nurseries

  • Broaden the scope of what and how we communicate the full spectrum of research results to the public and scientific communities.

  • Encourage departments to regularly review their curriculum to improve their training of students for careers in agriculture, natural resources, and related disciplines.

Action Plan

Progress toward the listed objectives will be measured by such indicators as:

  • review and revision of faculty evaluation procedures to encourage and reward interdisciplinary activities

  • number of research and extension programs employing interdisciplinary and integrated management approaches, as reported to the U.S. Department of Agriculture

  • number of pesticide operators certified by extension training programs

  • number of research and extension programs related to marketing

  • contributions to technology innovation and transfer (for example, publications for scientific and lay audiences, patents, cultivars released, grants obtained, etc.)

  • competitiveness of students in the job market


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Support economic and community development

Industries allied with agriculture, family and consumer sciences, food, fiber, tourism, and natural resource management are major components of New Mexico’s economy. The agricultural and natural resources industries alone contribute several billion dollars annually, directly and indirectly, to the state’s economy, and provide approximately one-fifth of the jobs.

New Mexico’s economic growth requires strong development efforts and decisive action. The College’s role is the education of community and state leaders to help them design, develop, and implement economic strategies to improve the vitality of New Mexico’s economy and facilitate community planning for development.

The College has significantly affected economic development in the past, and it continues to do so. The economic benefits of some programs are short-term and visible. Others involve research that addresses fundamental biological, economic, or sociological processes or concepts, and offers extensive long-term benefits to agriculture and society in general.

Objectives

  • Encourage and reward interdisciplinary activities and cooperation with industries and communities, emphasizing both applied and fundamental methods for developing comprehensive solutions to important issues.

  • Conduct research, teaching, and extension programs on emerging critical issues, including:

    • supporting New Mexico business development and management

    • pursuing alternative crops for farmers

    • assessing actual and potential impact of College programs on economic development

  • Continue to improve and strengthen current research and extension programs that:

    • facilitate community and business planning activities, including activities of ranches and farms

    • emphasize existing programs and encourage the development of new programs that lead to the use of natural and human resources in a manner that provides greatest economic benefits, taking into consideration ecological, biological, social, and cultural values

    • emphasize food science, food technology, and post-harvest handling and processing of value-added agricultural products

    • emphasize practical aspects of agricultural marketing, help identify marketing and promotional opportunities for specific agricultural and fiber products, and include team approaches to solving marketing problems

  • Encourage departments to regularly review their curriculum to improve their training of students for careers in agricultural economics, agricultural business, marketing and development.

  • Broaden the scope of what and how we communicate the full spectrum of research results to the public and scientific communities.

  • Increase efforts to inform the public and members of government about the College’s economic development activities

Action Plan

Progress toward the listed objectives will be measured by such indicators as:

  • number of programs relating to economic development, including fashion merchandising and related small business areas

  • amount of resources used to address economic development

  • conducting market impact studies and industry surveys to measure economic impact of programs

  • number of contacts and courses conducted by extension for government units, private industry, communities, and individuals

  • amount of resources spent on food technology and other processing issues

  • number of students participating in co-op and internships

  • competitiveness of students in the job market


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Expand programs on environmental issues and natural resources management

Both rural and urban human activities can pollute land, water, air, and food. Through teaching, research, and extension programs, the College is committed to furthering our understanding, using science-based knowledge, of human impact on the environment, and to supporting environmentally-sound agricultural and natural resource practices. The College will continue its efforts to understand the interaction between the environment and production agriculture.

New Mexico has a rich and diverse land and natural resource base that is arid and semiarid and, in many respects, extremely fragile. This natural resource base is a major contributor to the economic well-being of the state’s residents. Its economic uses result in demands for various resources. In addition to direct demands for land and water, there is increasing pressure for recreation-related activities that represent a growing economic opportunity. Activities related to the state’s natural beauty and its wildlife make a major contribution to the economy. The potential to develop, manage, and protect natural resources needs to be encouraged.

Objectives

  • Encourage and reward interdisciplinary and integrated relationships with other research entities, such as NMSU’s Geography Department, Biology Department, Chemistry Department, and Physical Science Laboratory, and the USDA Jornada Experimental Range, emphasizing both applied and fundamental methods for developing comprehensive solutions to important issues.

  • Conduct research, teaching, and extension programs on emerging critical issues, including:

    • the impact of urbanization on the environment

    • the effects of recreational and tourism activities on natural resources

    • policies resulting from the influx of new residents

    • cultural and social issues related to demographic shifts and agricultural transformation

    • the information and technology needs of natural resources managers

  • Continue to improve and strengthen current research and extension programs that:

    • address multiple uses of land

    • investigate alternative enterprises based on utilization of natural resources

    • develop natural resource management practices to ensure that socially and environmentally optimal resource uses are achieved

    • address water quality issues

    • address soil and food contamination, waste management, watershed, and erosion problems

    • address wildlife habitat needs, economic value of wildlife, and maintenance of biodiversity

    • identify efficient uses of existing water resources

    • address the effectiveness of recreational hospitality and tourism practices

    • identify the physical and economic trade-offs that would result from modifying existing management practices

    • assist land management agencies in developing standards and guidelines for land use and conservation

  • Broaden the scope of what and how we communicate the full spectrum of research results to the public and scientific communities.

  • Provide data and other information to the public, to government agencies, to private industry, and to legislators on environmental issues

  • Educate users of public lands about land use standards and the monitoring of land condition

  • Encourage departments to regularly review their curriculum to improve their training of students for careers in environmental science, natural resources management, and related disciplines.

Action Plan

Progress toward the listed objectives will be measured by such indicators as:

  • number of programs concerning natural resources or environmental issues research or education

  • number of times information provided to governmental units, private industry, communities, and individuals regarding environmental and natural resource management issues

  • conducting impact studies or surveys to measure change in environmental practices

  • competitiveness of students in the job market


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Enhance the quality of life for the people of New Mexico

The family is the fundamental institution of society. In a rapidly changing world, the challenges facing individuals and families are great. With the problem-solving philosophy of the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences and its teaching, research, and extension education capability, responses can be developed to deal with complex issues facing New Mexico families.

Population changes create new challenges in New Mexico. Progressive urbanization, an increasing percentage of multiple-income families, and an increasingly multicultural society are some of the trends that create needs and opportunities for the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences . A better understanding of how to meet the needs of new groups, while continuing strong existing programs for the people of New Mexico, is needed. Special emphasis should be given to the needs of rural health, food safety, and nutrition issues. Continued research is called for in human behavior, child and adolescent development, human nutrition and food science, clothing and textiles, and family resource management.

Objectives

  • Encourage and reward interdisciplinary activities and cooperation with private organizations, government units, and communities.

  • Conduct research, teaching, and extension programs on emerging critical issues in family and consumer sciences, and tourism services to enhance the socioeconomic well-being of New Mexicans.

  • Continue to improve and strengthen current research and extension programs that:

    • address coping strategies, decision-making skill, communication skills, and consumer behavior

    • increase our understanding of the language, customs, values, and needs of New Mexico’s diverse citizenry

    • teach family resource management skills to the citizens of New Mexico

    • help young people acquire knowledge, develop life skills, and form attitudes that enable them to become self-directing, productive, and contributing members of society

  • Broaden the scope of what and how we communicate the full spectrum of research results to the public and scientific communities.

  • Encourage departments to regularly review their curriculum to improve their training of students for careers in human nutrition, food science, family science, child development, consumer science, clothing, textiles, and fashion merchandising, tourism managment, hotel management, and restaurant and food service management, and related disciplines.

Action Plan

Progress toward the listed objectives will be measured by such indicators as:

  • number of agreements between the College and governmental and private organizations

  • competitiveness of students in the job market

  • number of times information is provided to governmental units, private industry, communities, and individuals on family, consumer, and tourism issues


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Continue a targeted involvement in multistate, regional, and international programs

New Mexico’s future is increasingly tied to regional environments and a global economy. Clearly defined regional and international perspectives are essential for the programs of the College. Regional and international involvement lead to program enrichment valuable to our state and its people. Research today requires an expanded geographic base of operations because of the worldwide spread of information, data, expertise, and funding sources, and the demand for graduate education. The University’s traditional programs can be enriched by regional and international components and thereby better achieve their full potential. International activities enhance global understanding by incorporating international dimensions into the ongoing instruction, research, and extension efforts of the College.

Graduates of the College need an education that will allow them to achieve success in a global economy. They must have the skills necessary to keep New Mexico a supplier of food and fiber throughout the world and keep New Mexico a destination for tourists from around the world.

Objectives

  • Encourage and reward multistate, regional, and international research, teaching, and extension activities, when appropriate, including:

    • working with industry to develop an international trade center or related institution to enhance the value of New Mexico products for export

    • participating with the University in its effort to internationalize its courses of study

    • working with industry to develop educational, work-related opportunities for students

  • Communicate the importance of regional and international activities to New Mexico citizenry and legislators.

  • Continue to recruit international students, especially from Mexico and Latin America.

Action Plan

Progress toward the listed objectives will be measured by such indicators as:

  • number of multistate, regional, and international projects

  • number of internships and cooperative opportunities for students

  • number of international students enrolled in the College

  • activity in courses with an international focus and participation in the University’s "Viewing a Wider World" program

  • number and types of courses cross-listed for interdisciplinary purposes

  • competitiveness of students in the job market


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College-Wide, Mission-Supporting Initiatives

The college-wide, mission-supporting initiatives address the NMSU strategic directions mission-supporting goals 1 (Personnel), 2 (Focus on Diversity), 3 (Information and Student Resources), 4 (Facilities), 5 (Financial Resources), and 6 (University Relations).

    Improve the image and visibility of the College

    To grow and prosper, the College must broaden the image of agriculture and home economics and communicate that image to the public. Most people are aware of our contributions to production agriculture, but few appreciate the broad spectrum of activities supported by the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences . Agriculture includes many kinds of business enterprises like handling, transportation, processing, marketing, and a broad range of businesses in the service sector. Natural resource management is a major concern of the College because of the demand for natural resources and the potential impacts that human activities have on them. Family and consumer-related issues are important components of programs in Home Economics. The College has the responsibility to create a public awareness of, and an accurate perspective about, the nature and extent of contemporary agriculture, family and consumer sciences, and natural resources studies.

    Objectives

    • Broaden the scope of what and how we communicate the full spectrum of research results to the public and scientific communities by blending traditional communication methods with telecommunication and other high-tech approaches to project a well-defined image of the College.

      • Develop information that can be used to communicate the broad and high-quality services of the College

      • inform the people of New Mexico about accomplishments, areas of excellence, and the impacts of College accomplishments

      • communicate with legislators to inform them how the College is helping them solve key problems for the people they represent

      • continue communication and cooperative efforts with family and agricultural commodity groups

      • promote and market the academic programs in NMSU’s College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

      • inform people about the types of jobs available in agriculture and family and consumer sciences

    • Continue to improve the functional and esthetic quality of the classrooms, laboratories, buildings, and grounds of the College.

    • Expand efforts to organize alumni, retirees, and constituents as a political, financial, and recruiting support group.


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    Increase the level of support for the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences from the citizens of New Mexico, local, state, and federal governments and agencies, private corporations, foundations, and alumni.

    Strengthening ties with citizens, alumni, legislators, and government agencies, and with business and industry leaders helps ensure adequate support for the development and maintenance of high-priority programs. The College strongly supports commercial production agriculture, and also has a responsibility to help the public understand the food and fiber production process. Increasing public education about agriculture and family and consumer sciences ultimately increases support for College research and development efforts and helps safeguard programs that are essential to the citizens of New Mexico.

    Objectives

    • Explore approaches to educating the public about the importance of College programs to the quality of life.

    • Continue participating with constituency and lay groups within cooperative ventures and coalition-building activities with the College. Sustain working relationships with constituency groups to build a strong support base, and elicit assistance in developing and marketing priority programs.

    • Continue to expand and refine the College’s legislative liaison initiative. Expand the involvement of agricultural industry and human services agencies personnel, and work throughout the year in building legislative support.

    • Continue to identify and develop alternative resources (funding sources, personnel, organizations) achieving the College’s mission.

    • Increase cooperation and collaboration with industry.

    • Work with industry to provide professional, field-based experience (internships, externships, industry experience) for students

     


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    Increase student and employer satisfaction with the relevance of our academic programs

    Today’s students are tomorrow’s leaders. The College should address the need for leadership by recruiting and educating outstanding students. By being aware of market developments, the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences needs to recruit students and provide them with relevant curricula to meet the demand for graduates and provide tomorrow’s leaders.

    • Develop and implement a coordinated College recruitment and retention plan aimed at both traditional and nontraditional students.

      • continue to identify and develop areas of excellence to attract quality students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, making special efforts to develop and maintain diversity

      • facilitate the effective use of scholarships as a recruitment tool

      • facilitate the enrollment of transfer students, especially those from other New Mexico colleges and from adjacent states by continuing to establish articulation agreements with other educational institutions for transfer of course credits

      • continue efforts to include secondary school teachers and extension agents in recruiting quality students

      • increase scholarship opportunities within the College

      • increase work-study job opportunities within the College

      • expand job placement activities within the College

    • Encourage and support faculty and staff training, development, and recognition.

    • Continue technological development and improvement of classes and facilities.

    • give high priority to improving classrooms and other educational facilities for students

    • develop effective, high-quality distance education processes

    • provide training and resource materials to facilitate recruiting and retention efforts that portray a progressive image of the College so that the College becomes associated, in the minds of potential students, industry, and the public with the high-tech, science-oriented sectors of the economy it serves


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    The Strategic Planning Process–1987 to 1996

    The members of the Strategic Planning Committee in 1996 were:

    Chris Allison,* Chair – Cooperative Extension Service, Animal Resources
    Ron Byford* – Entomology, Plant Pathology and Weed Science
    Gerald Chacon* & #150; Cooperative Extension Service, Northern District
    Joe Ellington* – Entomology, Plant Pathology and Weed Science
    Mark Petersen – Animal and Range Sciences
    Roberta Rios – Cooperative Extension Service, Rio Arriba County
    John Waelti – Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Business, and Extension Economics

    *elected

    Ron Gurley and Steve Loring served as facilitators for the Strategic Planning Committee.


    The following faculty made a major contribution to the College’s original strategic plan by serving on the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences ’ Strategic Planning Committee between the years 1987 and 1991:

    Joe Armstrong – Animal and Range Sciences
    Joy Best – Cooperative Extension Service
    Paul Biemer – Experimental Statistics
    Joe Corgan, Chair (1989—90) – Agronomy and Horticulture
    Cliff Currier – Agronomy and Horticulture
    Charles Davis – Fishery and Wildlife Sciences
    Billy Dictson – Cooperative Extension Service
    Joe Ellington – Entomology, Plant Pathology and Weed Science
    James Knight, Chair (1987—89) – Cooperative Extension Service
    Roberta Rios – Cooperative Extension Service
    Lynn Robbins – Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Business<
    Scott Urquhart – Experimental Statistics

    Mary Ellen Roddy served as facilitator for the Strategic Planning Committee.


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