Parts of A Grant

What is a Grant - a conditional gift or transference of funds with strings attached.

Types of Grants - Know what type of grant you need. The Foundation Directory Online lists the following types:

Advocacy

Annual campaigns

Awards / prizes / competitions

Building / renovation

Business startups / expansion

Camperships

Capital campaigns

Capitalizing loan funds / other intermediaries

Charitable use assets

Collections acquisition

Collections management / preservation

Commissioning new works

Computer technology

Conferences / seminars

Continuing support

Curriculum development

Debt reduction

Electronic media / online services

Emergency funds

Employee matching gifts

Employee-related scholarships

Endowments

Equipment

Equity investments

Exhibitions

Faculty / staff development

Fellowships

Film / video / radio

Foundation-administered programs

General / operating support

Income development

In-kind gifts

Interim financing

Internship funds

Land acquisition

Line of credit

Linked deposits

Loan guarantees

Loans / promissory notes

Management development / capacity building

Matching / challenge support

Mortgage financing

Officers & trustees discretionary grants

Performance / productions

Professorships

Program development

Program evaluation

Program-related investments / loans

Publication

Research

Scholarship funds

Seed money

Student aid / financial aid

Technical assistance

Travel awards

Cover Page / Title

  • The title briefly summarizes your topic and captures the reviewer's interest.

Abstract / Problem or Needs Statement

  • The abstract defines your project plan; provides preliminary and proposed work, and states significance of the project in a concise paragraph. This section should pique the reviewer's interest and prepare him or her for the rest of the proposal.

Goals & Objectives

  • Goal: A goal is an overarching, long-term statement of achievement for a project or program. It's a brief, general statement outlining the long-term effect of your work. Projects generally should have only one goal, with many objectives supporting the accomplishment of that goal. (Unless, of course, an RFP gives a different definition.) Goals should be only one sentence.

  • Objectives: Objectives are the specific means of measuring and accomplishing a goal. It's acceptable to have multiple objectives for a proposal, but don't get carried away and promise the world. Each objective should list very specific information on what and when something will be accomplished. How many people will change their behavior, and what's your deadline for accomplishing this? Do you plan to raise the test scores of 80% of your participants by the end of the two-year grant period? Give each outcome a separate objective; don't try to make compound objectives with multiple things to accomplish in each, because that makes one single objective more difficult to measure or report on.

Source: (Hill, Megan. "The Basics of Goals and Objectives." Professional Grant Writer. Professional Grant Writers | Grant Writing Consultants - Tips and Advice on Nonprofit Grant Writing from Professional Grant Writers and Grant Writing Consultants, 11 Nov. 2011. Web. 10 Dec. 2014. The Basics of Goals & Objectives.

Methodology

  • A set of procedures, or methods to be analyzed in a particular field.

Quality of Key Personnel

  • Sell your project team; you need to prove to the reviewers that you are capable of performing the proposed work, which includes a deep understanding of the literature and issues in you field and the ability to plan, carry out, and possibly revise the planned project.

Evaluation

  • The evaluation determines effectiveness and defines how success of your project is to be measured.

Dissemination

  • Findings and final results of your project is made known. The spreading of information found.

References Cited

  • Alphabetically organized list of all sources involved in the project.

Budget & Narrative

  • A proposed budget for the project is outlined, and supported by an explanation for the costs.

Vitae

  • A biographical statement showing professional qualification for the grant project. Similar, but not the same, to a resume.

Appendices

  • Additional attached detailed information