NMSU branding

WILDLIFE Management: Wildlife and Livestock Interactions

Wednesday, June 8, 2011




Morning Sessions


Principles of Wildlife Management
Dr. Samuel Smallidge, Extension Wildlife Specialist, Director of Range Improvement Task Force
Cooperative Extension Service, New Mexico State University

Understanding the fundamental role of science in wildlife MANAGEMENT provides a foundation for future caretakers of the land to make informed resource decisions. This session will give the participants a taste of wildlife MANAGEMENT and the science that guides it. This baseline overview will introduce participants to the two basic principles of managing wildlife on the ranch: HABITAT and POPULATION MANAGEMENT.


Methods and Programs used to Manage Wildlife in New Mexico
Donald Auer, Habitat Specialist
New Mexico Game and Fish Department

New Mexico Department of Game and Fish are trustees for the state's wildlife. They are charged with managing population and supporting habitat MANAGEMENT in New Mexico. The Department will discuss their approach to habitat MANAGEMENT and how it applies to public and private lands in New Mexico.


Wildlife Damage Management
Allen May, State Director
Wildlife Services, USDA-APHIS

Wildlife damage MANAGEMENT is an important tool in the tool bag (e.g. wildlife MANAGEMENT). When wildlife become a nuisance, Wildlife Services is the agency to call. Wildlife Services will discuss specific programs common to New Mexico. This session will provide the participants a hands-on opportunity to set traps, snares and discuss other methods used in wildlife damage MANAGEMENT.


Afternoon Sessions


Principles in Wildlife Management (continued)
Dr. Samuel Smallidge, Extension Wildlife Specialist
New Mexico State University

Dr. Douglas Cram, College Assistant Professor
Cooperative Extension Service, New Mexico State University

Summer Eaton, Program Coordinator
Cooperative Extension Service, New Mexico State University

Following a synthesis of the morning topics, the afternoon session will cover the following:

- Applied methods in wildlife habitat MANAGEMENT- Livestock grazing, fire, brush control, timber stand improvement, watershed management, water developments, etc.

- Wildlife monitoring- How, why, and when to monitor

- Principles in population dynamics- Discussion of theory, interaction with habitat MANAGEMENT, and practical approaches to harvesting game species

- Integrating habitat MANAGEMENT into ranch operations

- Fee hunting opportunities for land owners




Evening Sessions


Archery
New Mexico Game and Fish Department

Participants will have the opportunity to shoot at 3D archery targets.


Spotlight Survey

This group activity will give the participants a hands-on opportunity to conduct a spotlight survey.