NMSU: Documents Required to Transport Horses in New Mexico
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Authors: Respectively, Extension Horse Specialist, Department of Extension Animal Sciences and Natural Resources, New Mexico State University; Extension Veterinarian, Department of Extension Animal Sciences and Natural Resources, New Mexico State University; and Area Supervisor, New Mexico Livestock Board.

Introduction

Determining which official documents are required for transporting horses into, around, and out of New Mexico can be confusing for the new horse owner. Furthermore, in the modern age of animal disease surveillance, these requirements may be modified on a frequent basis. While the recommendations in this guide were current at the time of publication, owners should contact the New Mexico Livestock Board and/or the specific equine event they are attending to determine if additional documentation is needed. Once you have properly determined what documents are required for transporting your horses, it is recommended that you prepare a notebook to keep all of the following information organized and readily available in the vehicle when transporting your horses. A copy of this notebook kept in the home is a valuable “back up” of this important information.

Brand Inspection

When traveling within the district your horse resides in (Figure 1), a brand inspection form (Figure 2) is not required; however, it is recommended that you carry proof of ownership (bill of sale or registration papers) at all times. When you transport your horse from one inspection district to another, you are required to have a current brand inspection form (Figure 2) dated within the previous 7 days or a permanent hauling permit (Form 1-H; Figure 3). Furthermore, horses that reside in New Mexico for more than 30 days are required to have a brand inspection. For more information, please contact the New Mexico Livestock Board or the local brand inspector in your district.

Figure 1. Map indicating inspection districts for the New Mexico Livestock Board. Courtesy of the New Mexico Livestock Board.

Figure 2. Example of temporary brand inspection form used by the New Mexico Livestock Board. Courtesy of the New Mexico Livestock Board.

Figure 3. Example of Form 1-H. Courtesy of the New Mexico Livestock Board.

Veterinary Inspection

Although a certificate of veterinary inspection (CVI; Figure 4), or what is commonly referred to as “health papers,” is not routinely required for transporting horses within New Mexico, a CVI is required when transporting horses across the New Mexico state line into surrounding states. A CVI is available from a licensed New Mexico veterinarian, and it is normally valid for 30 days following the official inspection of the horse(s) it covers. On the CVI, the veterinarian provides specific information about the horses being shipped; the CVI may also include the results of laboratory tests used to verify that the horses are free of certain diseases.

Figure 4. Example of Certificate of Veterinary Inspection used by New Mexico Livestock Board.

Figure 4. Example form used by the New Mexico Livestock Board for Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. Courtesy of the New Mexico Livestock Board.

In addition to the CVI, a copy of the form (Figure 5) used to verify a negative laboratory test for equine infectious anemia (EIA) is required for transport across the New Mexico state line as well as entry into various exhibition grounds, shows, and rodeos in New Mexico. This form is commonly referred to as a horse's Coggins' papers. Normally, these test results are valid for use in transporting horses for 12 months following the test; however, some states or specific venues may require more frequent testing. Specific laboratory tests for other diseases in addition to EIA (e.g., equine viral arteritis, equine piroplasmosis, etc.) may be required to verify that the horses being transported are free of disease. These tests may only be required of horses of a certain breed, age, sex, use, or geographic location. Be sure to check with the appropriate regulatory agency to determine if documents other than the CVI and EIA forms are required for the horse(s) you intend to transport.

Figure 5. Example of form used to record Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA or CogginsŐ) test results for horses

Figure 5. Example of form used to record Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA or CogginsŐ) test results for horses. Available at: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/animal_diseases/eia/downloads/vs_form10-11.pdf

Specific locations and/or events

Shipping horses to specific equine events (e.g., shows, rodeos, sales, etc.) in New Mexico or transporting horses to other states may entail more stringent entry requirements than those previously mentioned. Furthermore, transport requirements change frequently in order to minimize the spread of equine diseases. Therefore, horse owners are strongly encouraged to contact management of the specific event or the office of the state veterinarian where they intend to travel to determine the exact requirements for the dates of travel. Contact information for the office of the state veterinarian in New Mexico and adjoining states is provided below. Contact information for all 50 states is available from the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals/animal_import/animal_imports_states.shtml). For more information concerning export of horses to other countries, visit the USDA-APHIS website (http://www.aphis.usda.gov/regulations/vs/iregs/animals).

Office of the State Veterinarian
New Mexico Livestock Board
300 San Mateo NE, Suite 1000
Albuquerque, NM 87108
Telephone: (505) 841-6161
Fax: (505) 841-6160
http://www.nmlbonline.com/

Office of the State Veterinarian
Arizona State Department of Agriculture
1688 West Adams Street Phoenix, AZ 85007
Telephone: (602) 542-4293
Fax: (602) 542-4290
http://www.azda.gov

Office of the State Veterinarian
Colorado Department of Agriculture
Division of Animal Industry
700 Kipling St., Ste. 4000
Lakewood, CO 80215-8000
Telephone: (303) 239-4161
Fax: (303) 239-4164
http://www.colorado.gov/ag

Office of the State Veterinarian
Oklahoma Department of Agriculture
P.O. Box 528804 Oklahoma City, OK 73152
Telephone: (405) 521-3864
Fax: (405) 522-4912
http://www.oda.state.ok.us

Office of the State Veterinarian
Division of Animal Industry
Utah Department of Agriculture
P.O. Box 146500 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6500
Telephone: (801) 538-7100
Fax: (801) 538-7126
http://ag.utah.gov

Office of the State Veterinarian
Texas Animal Health Commission
P.O. Box 12966 Austin, TX 78711-2966
Telephone: (800) 550-8242
Fax: (512) 719-0719
http://www.tahc.state.tx.us

References

New Mexico Livestock Board. NM Import/Export Rules. Retrieved July 26, 2010, from http://www.nmlbonline.com/index.php?id=7

United States Animal Health Association. State Animal Health Officials (2010, May 24). Retrieved July 26, 2010 from http://www.usaha.org/StateAnimalHealthOfficials.pdf


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Printed and electronically distributed December 2010, Las Cruces, NM.