NMSU: Organic Good Agricultural Practices for New Mexico
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Author: Extension Food Technology Specialist, Department of Extension Family and Consumer Sciences, New Mexico State University.

Table of Contents

Executive Summary
Introduction
Food Safety Issues for Fresh Produce
GAPs: Food Safety Plan for Growers
Application of GAPs to Organic Operations
USDA GAP Audit Matrix
      General Questions
            Issues for Organic Producers
      Part 1 – Farm Review
            Issues for Organic Producers
      Part 2 – Field Harvest and Field Packing Activities
            Issues for Organic Producers
      Part 3 – House Packing Facility
            Issues for Organic Producers
      Part 4 – Storage and Transportation
            Issues for Organic Producers
      Part 6 – Wholesale Distribution Center
            Terminal Warehouses Issues for Organic Producers
      Part 7 – Preventive Food Defense Procedures
            Issues for Organic Producers
Conclusions
References
Other GAP Resources
Appendix A: List of GAPs forms available online


Executive Summary

Organic agricultural producers can use this document as a guide to implement Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) in their operations. Organic producers should use their Organic System Plan (OSP) and GAPs plan as dynamic management tools specific to their operations. Organic producers must first comply with U.S. Department of Agriculture National Organic Program (USDA NOP) standards for organic agriculture production given in the Code of Federal Regulations, 7 C.F.R. § 205. Good Agricultural Practices are utilized in a food safety plan that is specific to the farm operation; they should be used as a means to address food safety issues in food production that can also be easily applied to organic operations.

This document reviews the seven-part USDA GAP audit with regulations and reasoning behind each audit point to increase understanding and allow for easier adaptation and implementation of GAPs in a farming operation. Although some procedures and practices seem redundant, it is necessary to ensure compliance with either GAP or NOP requirements. Each program plan (NOP or GAP, including documentation) must be maintained separately for each certifying agency. There are many resources available both in print and online to help agricultural producers fully utilize GAPs within their operation.

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Introduction

The goal of this publication is to provide organic agricultural producers with a guide to implement Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) within their operations. Organic producers must first comply with U.S. Department of Agriculture National Organic Program (USDA NOP) standards for organic agriculture production given in the Code of Federal Regulations, 7 C.F.R. § 205 (available at http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov).

The Organic System Plan (OSP) is used by the organic producer and the certifying agent to evaluate compliance with USDA NOP standards for organic agriculture production. The OSP is a plan specific to the operation and is a dynamic tool to manage organic production. The type of organic operation may be crop production, livestock, wild harvest, or handler, or a combination of these types. There are five broad or general areas of evaluation, with specific requirements for each area, which must be addressed by the OSP for organic production of crops and/or livestock as per federal regulation 7 C.F.R. § 205.201:

  • The organic practices and procedures
  • A list of approved substances
  • A description of monitoring procedures
  • A description of recordkeeping methods
  • A description of preventative methods to control cross-contamination with non-organic production or comingling of non-organic products
  • Previous compliance with NOP organic practices

There are several resources available online to assist producers with organic production and plan development:

National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) https://attra.ncat.org/organic.html

USDA Agriculture Marketing Service http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/NOP

Organic producers are accustomed to recordkeeping and monitoring to maintain an organic system with very specific NOP standards. GAPs are utilized in a food safety plan that is specific to the farm operation. They are a management tool to address food safety issues in agricultural production and can also be easily applied to organic operations (Suslow, 2002). Even though some points are redundant, each program should be managed and maintained separately.

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Food Safety Issues for Fresh Produce

During the past few years, there has been more information about foodborne illness associated with fresh produce. While the actual incidence of illnesses has been low, media coverage of contamination is widespread. We know that there is the potential of foodborne illness from fresh produce.

Unlike most dairy and meat products, fresh produce does not undergo a “kill” step such as cooking to reduce microbial contamination. Fresh fruits and vegetables are often considered ready-to-eat and served fresh or used as part of a salad or other food that is not heated. This means that any pathogenic (illness-causing) microorganisms that might be present at harvest or after handling in the packing room can remain on the produce all the way to the consumer’s kitchen (CAST, 2009).

A grower or produce handler needs to know about foodborne illnesses and what causes them. This information can help focus food safety efforts on the hazards most likely to affect fresh produce. Microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, parasites, and molds) are the most common cause of foodborne illness. Table 1 lists various foodborne illness outbreaks associated with fresh produce. Because microorganisms cannot be seen, it is important to learn to control the food production environment to reduce the chances of contamination of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Table 1. Pathogens Associated with Fresh Produce Commodities from 1996 to 2006 (adapted from RTI International, 2009).

Category and commodity Common pathogens
In order of prevalence of foodborne outbreaks In order of prevalence
Leafy greens: lettuce; mesclun; spinach; romaine, leaf, iceberg, and bagged lettuce E. coli O157:H7 (EHEC), Salmonella enterica, Norovirus
Tomatoes: roma, cherry, grape Salmonella enterica, Norovirus
Melons: watermelon, cantaloupe, honeydew, musk Salmonella enterica, E. coli O157:H7 (EHEC)
Crucifers: cabbage, coleslaw, broccoli E. coli O157:H7 (EHEC), Cryptosporidium parvum
Mixed produce: salads (lettuce-, vegetable-, or fruit-based, garden, green, house, chef, cucumber), mixed vegetables, mixed fruit, green beans E. coli O157:H7 (EHEC), Salmonella enterica
Carrots Salmonella enterica
Herbs: basil, parsley, cilantro E. coli O157:H7 (EHEC)
Berries: strawberry, raspberry, blackberry, blueberry, grapes E. coli O157:H7 (EHEC)

Time–Temperature Relationships
Temperature is one of the most important and easily controlled growth factors for microorganisms. Microorganisms can grow excessively at temperatures that support growth for two or more hours. Temperatures favorable for growth range from 41° to 140° F; this range is known as the “danger zone” (FDA, 2009). Temperature control is an important way to maintain the quality of produce and minimize the growth of pathogens. Monitoring the temperatures of fresh produce and water is critical at all stages of handling, especially during harvesting, packing house activities, and transportation to final retail location.

Bacteria
Pathogenic bacteria are responsible for most foodborne illness. Pathogenic bacteria, such as Salmonella, Staphylococcus, and Listeria, on fresh produce have been found to cause illness. Harmful bacteria may be brought into your operation by animals, people, shoes, trucks, equipment, or boxes contaminating clean produce. Once the contaminated food is consumed, bacteria and bacterial toxins cause illness. The best defense is to learn to control the production environment to minimize the presence of microorganisms and prevent their growth (CAST, 2009).

Viruses
Viruses are another type of microorganism that can cause foodborne illness. Although the virus particles are not alive, they use food as a transport mechanism to get into a host organism. Once inside a human, they attach to a host cell, then reproduce rapidly and cause illness. Viruses are often found in contaminated water or an infected food handler or farm worker who came into contact with food. Viruses, such as norovirus and hepatitis A, have been identified in several outbreaks in fresh food prepared in restaurants. Following good hand-washing techniques and isolating sick workers can help to prevent the spread of viruses (Koopmans and Duizer, 2004).

Molds
There was a time when we thought that molds were harmless. New research has found that molds often develop toxins that may make a person ill, or may potentially cause cancer. Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Byssochylamys molds are known to produce patulin, a mycotoxin (mold toxin) that has been detected in apple and pear juices. Mycotoxins have also been found in grains and cheese. These toxins are usually controlled by proper culling and disposal of damaged or rotted fruits and vegetables (FDA, 2001).

Parasites
Parasites are microorganisms that live inside a host organism, but part of their life cycle can occur outside in the environment. Parasites may be found in contaminated water or soil, but can also be passed along by an infected worker with poor personal hygiene. Though parasites are most likely found in raw animal or seafood products, one parasitic organism associated with produce is Cyclospora cayetanensis. Although cooking fresh produce will kill parasites, parasitic infections can also be controlled by good hand washing and using good-quality water (USDA FSIS, 2011).

Chemical Hazards
Any chemical used in a facility can contaminate food via direct contact with foods or food preparation surfaces. Chemicals should be labeled and properly stored away from production areas. Check water supplies to be sure they do not contain hazardous chemicals, including lead (Katsuyama, 1993).

Physical Hazards
Most incidents of physical contamination, such as hair or gum, are more unsightly or unappetizing than dangerous. However, some physical contamination of a food product can be serious, resulting in injury to the consumer. Equipment, pallets, or harvesting containers in poor condition can be sources of physical contamination. Avoid the use of glass in food operations, and shield light bulbs to prevent contamination if breakage occurs. Routine monitoring and maintenance of equipment that handles produce will reduce the chance of serious physical contamination. Following good manufacturing practices in the packing house and retail operations will also help with incidental minor physical contamination (Katsuyama, 1993).

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GAPs: Food Safety Plan for Growers

A food safety plan for food producers must have a standard or measurement that is used to gauge the level of risk involved in a certain practice or procedure used in the production of food. The GAPs audit verification checklist developed by the USDA is such a standard. The USDA GAP audit is based on a Food and Drug Administration Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (FDA CFSAN) document Guidance for Industry: Guide to Minimize Microbial Food Safety Hazards for Fresh-cut Fruits and Vegetables (2008). A GAP auditor can evaluate an agricultural producer for GAP certification for all or part of the operation.

Auditors evaluating a facility for adherence to GAP standards will stop an audit if it is apparent that certain unsanitary conditions exist or if documents have been falsified. Conditions that allow for direct contamination of food production areas, including evidence of rodent and insect activity, will result in an automatic “unsatisfactory” rating. Additionally, an unsatisfactory rating will be given if employees are observed with poor hygienic practices.

The USDA GAP audit has several sections but starts with a section of “general questions” that deal with meeting basic implementation of a food safety plan with specific requirements for each, such as:

  • A documented food safety plan with a designated responsible person
  • Traceability or a trace-back system and testing of this system
  • Visitors and workers have access to potable water and clean toilets with hand-washing facilities
  • Signs are posted to reinforce employee training on sanitation and hygienic practices
  • Designated areas for smoking and eating for employees
  • Sick or injured workers to be segregated and treated following company policy; any affected or exposed product is properly disposed of
  • Only licensed personnel can apply regulated materials to fields and other facilities

A facility seeking GAP certification must complete all the general questions of the audit before proceeding with the other six sections that only apply to that operation. If the facility does not have a packing house then that section is not part of the audit. The USDA GAP audit has the following six sections with specific requirements for each section:

  • Part 1: Review of farm operation
  • Part 2: Harvesting and field packing activities
  • Part 3: Packing house/shed facility
  • Part 4: Storage and transportation
  • Part 5: (reserved)
  • Part 6: Wholesale distribution center
  • Part 7: Preventive food defense procedures

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Application of GAPs to Organic Operations

The following tables evaluate and explain the reason for each question in the USDA GAP audit. Included are the points assigned to each question as well as the level of documentation (“Doc”) needed to satisfy that audit point. For a facility to receive GAP certification, the audit must receive a passing score of 80% of the points adjusted for “N/A” or non-applicable points. Under the Doc column, a “D” requires that the facility have a written procedure as well as a record used to monitor that particular procedure; “R” requires a record, such as a purchase receipt, log, or checklist, to be used to monitor the procedure; and “P” requires a policy or standard procedure to be included in the food safety plan. Several requirements can be satisfied with the same document or record, but must be written specifically to address the various issues. Not every audit question requires documentation. Appendix A contains examples of forms that can be used for recordkeeping. However, there are several resources available online to help producers generate all of these documents.

Cornell GAPs farm and packing house recordkeeping sheets http://www.gaps.cornell.edu/rks.html

NMSU GAPs signs and recordkeeping forms http://aces.nmsu.edu/ces/foodtech/gap-nm.html

FamilyFarmed.org On-Farm Food Safety Project http://onfarmfoodsafety.org

Challenges specific to organic producers will be addressed following each table in a section called “Issues for Organic Producers.” Each organic producer must develop specific solutions or remedies appropriate for their operation. However, general recommendations will be discussed, and appropriate reference to federal regulations will be noted.

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Adapted from USDA GAP Audit Matrix (USDA, 2012)

Fig. General Questions.

Issues for Organic Producers — General Questions

There are no specific challenges for organic production in this section of the GAP audit. Portable toilets in any farming operation must be set up properly to protect from any sewage discharge, especially in active crop production areas. Additionally, there must be a plan to clean up and contain any accidental contamination from a portable toilet. The organic certifier must approve the portable toilet for organic operations. Adequate sanitation and hand-washing facilities must be provided to employees working in fields (1 unit per 20 persons) to meet requirements in the Occupational Safety and Health Act (29 C.F.R. § 1928.110; Lehtola et al., 2007).

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Part 1 - Farm Review.Part 1 - Farm Review contd.

Issues for Organic Producers — Farm Review

The farm review section of the GAP audit offers the most challenges for organic producers that must be addressed early on in the process for GAP certification. In many cases, organic producers are already dealing with these issues and can comply with GAPs with minor adjustments.

GAP audit question Recommendation
1-4 This question would not apply (“N/A”) to organic producers that only use water for irrigation. However, growers must consider upstream operations in the area and monitor water quality for microbial contamination on a regular basis even though they may not have control of water source. Consider testing water at the point of use for fecal contamination levels at the start of the irrigation season and any time contamination may have occurred from excess rainfall or runoff from other operations (Schneider et al., 2010).
1-8 Milking parlors and pens holding livestock must be maintained to control manure discharge into active crop production areas. These types of operations pose a higher risk of discharge contamination via failure or leakage of manure lagoons into surrounding areas, contaminating soil and water. Organic regulation 7 C.F.R. § 205.239(a)(1-5) also specifies how to deal with this issue.
1-9 & 10 Organic producers already maintain manure lagoon and storage areas to prevent contamination of crop production areas per 7 C.F.R. § 205.239(e).
1-11 to 13 Reduce wild and domestic animal as well as livestock activity in crop production areas with fencing or other deterrents specific to the crop and production methods. Organic producers can locate bat houses and bird perches outside of their fields and take steps to minimize risk by putting a berm around them so waste does not wash into fields (Davis and Kendall, 2005). Organic regulation 7 C.F.R. § 205.206(3) mentions that cultural practices should reduce disease or pests in fields, and 7 C.F.R. § 205.239(e) states that pastures and other outdoor areas must be managed to reduce the potential for contamination of soil or water. Documentation of monitoring of crop production areas can be added to records used for pest management (7 C.F.R. § 205.206).
1-14 to 1-17 Raw manure can be applied before planting, but the crop must be harvested 120 days later. This is more restrictive than 7 C.F.R. § 205.203(c)ii, which allows for different harvest dates for different crops. Organic producers wishing to obtain GAPs certification should follow the GAPs requirement.
1-18 to 1-21 Composted manure must be properly treated and stored, and supported with documentation as stated in 7 C.F.R. § 205.203(2)ii. GAPs require verification of low fecal coliform count before use. Additionally, 7 C.F.R. § 205.203(e)2 strictly prohibits the use of biosolids in organic crop production. Composted manure should be composted accordingly to meet both NOP and GAPs requirements.
1-24 Previous land use history is valuable for planting appropriate crops or setting aside for decontamination if needed for organic production or for food safety issues
(7 C.F.R. § 205.202).
1-26 Organic production areas and records are maintained as stated in the farm’s OSP (7 C.F.R. § 205.103) and can be used for traceability in case of a recall.

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Part 2 - Field Harvest and Field Packing Activities.

Issues for Organic Producers — Field Harvest and Field Packing Activities

There are no specific challenges for organic production in this section of the GAP audit. However adequate sanitation and hand-washing facilities must be provided to employees working in fields to meet Occupational Safety and Health Act 29 C.F.R. § 1928.110 requirements. Portable toilets require proper setup, and must be located at a proper buffering distance away from active crop production areas to reduce the possibility of contamination with biosolids or runoff from any field unit. The organic certifier would have to approve the location and setup of the portable unit.

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Part 3 - House Packing Facility.Part 3 - House Packing Facility contd.

Issues for Organic Producers — House Packing Facility

GAP audit question Recommendation
3-15 & 16 Food-grade chemicals, such as lubricant, detergent, and sanitizers or antimicrobial agents, must also be NOP-approved substances listed in 7 C.F.R. § 205.600.
3-30 & 31 Pest control addressed in OSP must outline methods including physical exclusion, traps, and permitted application of pesticide with appropriate monitoring and documentation (7 C.F.R. §205.206).

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Part 4 - Storage and Transportation.Part 4 - Storage and Transportation contd.

Issues for Organic Producers — Storage and Transportation

There are no specific challenges for organic production in this section of the GAP audit because 7 C.F.R. § 205.206 specifies methods for pest control and maintenance of storage areas, sanitary conditions of containers, and the interior of buildings in organic operations.

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Part 6 - Wholesale Distribution Center/Terminal Warehouses.Part 6 - Wholesale Distribution Center/Terminal Warehouses contd.Part 6 - Wholesale Distribution Center/Terminal Warehouses contd..

Issues for Organic Producers — Wholesale Distribution Center/Terminal Warehouses

There are no specific challenges for organic production in this section of the GAP audit. However, food-grade chemicals such as antimicrobial agents must also be NOP approved substances listed in 7 C.F.R.

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Part 7 - Preventive Food Defense Procedures.Part 7 - Preventive Food Defense Procedures contd.

Issues for Organic Producers — Preventive Food Defense Procedures

There are no specific challenges for organic production in this section of the GAP audit. Farms are exempt from Food Facility Registration unless they also perform activities that require registration, such as manufacturing and processing foods (http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodDefense/Bioterrorism/FoodFacilityRegistration/ucm081610.htm).

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Conclusions

Organic producers should use their Organic System Plan (OSP) as a dynamic management tool specific to their operation. Organic producers are accustomed to recordkeeping and monitoring to maintain an organic system to produce crops and livestock within very specific National Organic Program standards. Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) are utilized in a food safety plan that is specific to the farm operation and should be used as a means to address food safety issues in food production that can also be easily applied to organic operations. As with any agricultural operation, many GAP practices are followed but lack a written policy, plan, or recordkeeping.

Reviewing the seven-part USDA GAP audit with regulations and reasoning behind each audit point to increase understanding allows for easier adaptation and implementation of GAPs into a farming operation. Although some procedures and practices seem redundant, it is necessary to ensure compliance with either GAP or NOP requirements. Each program plan (NOP or GAP), including documentation, must be maintained separately for each certifying agency. There are many resources available both in print and online to help agricultural producers fully utilize GAPs within their operation.

Back to Table of Contents


References

Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST). 2009. Food safety and fresh produce: An update [CAST Commentary QTA2009-1, Online]. Retrieved December 2011 from http://www.cast-science.org/publications/?food_safety_and_fresh_produce_an_update&show=product&productID=2946

Davis, J.G., and P. Kendall. 2005. Preventing E. coli from garden to plate [Publication no. 9.369, Online]. Retrieved January 18, 2012, from http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/foodnut/09369.html

Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 2001. Patulin in apple juice, apple juice concentrates and apple juice products [Online]. Available from http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodSafety/FoodContaminantsAdulteration/NaturalToxins/ucm212520.htm

Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 2008. Guidance for industry: Guide to minimize microbial food safety hazards for fresh-cut fruits and vegetables [Online]. Retrieved December 2011 from http://www.fda.gov/food/guidancecomplianceregulatoryinformation/guidancedocuments/produceandplanproducts/ucm064458.htm

Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 2009. FDA food code 2009: Specifications for receiving, 3-202.11 temperature [Online]. Retrieved January 18, 2012, from http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodSafety/RetailFoodProtection/FoodCode/FoodCode2009/ucm186451.htm

Katsuyama, A.M. 1993. Principles of food processing sanitation, 2nd ed. Washington, D.C.: The Food Processing Institute.

Koopmans, M., and E. Duizer. 2004. Foodborne viruses: An emerging problem. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 90, 23–41.

Lehtola, C.J., C.M. Brown, and W.J. Becker. 2007. Field sanitation — OSHA standard 1928.110 [Publication #ABE132, Online]. Retrieved December 2011 from http://edistt.ifas.ufl.edu/oa120

National Organic Program, 7 C.F.R. § 205. 2000.

National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service. 2011. Organic farming [Online]. Retrieved December 2011 from https://attra.ncat.org/organic.html

Occupational Safety and Health Standards for Agriculture, 29 C.F.R. § 1928. 2011.

RTI International. 2009. Fresh produce risk ranking tool summary: Identification of priority pathogen-commodity combinations for quantitative microbial risk assessment [RTI Number 0211460.001, Online]. Available from http://foodrisk.org/default/assets/File/Produce_RRT_report_RTI.pdf

Schneider, K.R., R. Goodrich-Schneider, and D.L. Archer. 2010. Food safety on the farm: Good agricultural practices and good handling practices—Water [Publication #FSHN06-02, Online]. Retrieved December 2011 from http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs136

Simonne, A., and D. Treadwell. 2008. Minimizing food safety hazards for organic growers [Publication #FCS8872, Online]. Retrieved December 2011 from http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/FY/FY106200.pdf

Suslow, T. 2002. Postharvest handling for organic crops [Publication 7254, Online]. Available from http://anrcatalog.ucdavis.edu/pdf/7254.pdf

U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2012. USDA good agricultural practices good handling practices audit verification checklist [Online]. Available from http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfile?dDocName=STELPRDC5091326

U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS). 2010. Safe food handling: Molds on food: Are they dangerous? [Online]. Retrieved January 18, 2012, from http://www.fsis.usda.gov/FactSheets/Molds_On_Food/

U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS). 2011. Foodborne illness & disease: Parasites and foodborne illness [Online]. Retrieved January 18, 2012, from http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Factsheets/Parasites_and_Foodborne_Illness/index.asp

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Other GAP Resources

United Fresh—Produce GAPs Harmonization Initiative http://www.unitedfresh.org/newsviews/gap_harmonization

GLOBALG.A.P. http://www.globalgap.org/cms/front_content.php?idcat=9


Appendix A: List of GAP Forms Available Online

Cornell GAPs farm and packing house recordkeeping sheets
http://www.gaps.cornell.edu/rks.html

      Worker training log
      Field sanitation unit service log
      Processing packing line water log
      Water treatment log
      Pest/rodent control log
      Cooler temperature log with calibration note
      Truck checklist log
      Illness/injury reporting log
      First aid kit monitoring log
      Manure application log
      Surface water testing log
      Mock traceback log
      Visitor log

NMSU GAPs recordkeeping forms and signs
http://aces.nmsu.edu/ces/foodtech/gap-nm.html

      Forms
      Company information sheet checklist
      GAPs pack sheet
      Sanitation checklist
      Thermometer calibration log
      Ingredient and supplies inventory log
      Finished product inventory log
      Chemical inventory log

      Signs
      Drinking water (bilingual)
      Hand washing station (bilingual)
      Hand washing instructions
      First aid (bilingual)
      Non-potable water (bilingual)
      Report injuries (bilingual)
      Break areas (bilingual)
      Smoking area
      Male/female toilet facilities
      Danger flammable liquids (bilingual)
      Restricted area (bilingual)
      Danger chemical storage area (bilingual)
      No smoking, eating, or drinking

On-Farm Food Safety Project food safety documents
https://onfarmfoodsafety.org

      General Requirements
      Food Safety Plan Audit Log
      Deviations and Corrective Action Log
      Example Traceback Log
      Form 1: Recall Information
      Form 2: Product Information
      Form 3: Contact Information
      Form 4: Recall Notification
      Form 5: Product Retrieval
      Form 6: Follow-Up Plan
      Employee Training Log

      Worker Health and Hygiene
      Employee Training Log
      Accident/Injury Form
      Sewage & Septic Systems Equipment Inspection Log
      Personal Hygiene Facility Cleaning Log
      Break Area Cleaning Log

      Previous Land Use and Site Selection
      Risk Assessment Form
      Agricultural Inputs Form

      Agricultural Water
      Agricultural Water Inspection Log
      Risk Assessment Form
      Water Testing Result Log
      Employee Training Log

      Agricultural Chemicals
      Employee Training Log
      Agricultural Chemical Inputs Form
      Animals and Pest Control
      Risk Assessment Form
      Pest Control Log Form
      Employee Training Log
      Soil Amendments and Manure
      Compost Time and Temperature Log
      Agricultural Inputs Form
      Field Harvesting
      Employee Training Log
      Equipment Inspection, Cleaning, Maintenance and Calibration Form
      Water Temperature Control and Monitoring
      Water Treatment Log
      Equipment List
      Risk Assessment Form
      Transportation (Field to Packing House)
      Employee Training Log
      Transportation Vehicle Inspection Log/Checklist
      Equipment Inspection, Cleaning, Maintenance and Calibration Form
      Packing House Activities
      Approved Raw Materials List
      Equipment Inspection, Cleaning, Maintenance and Calibration Form
      Preventative Cleaning/Maintenance Schedule
      Cleaning, Maintenance, and Repair of Buildings Checklist
      Water Treatment Log
      Water Temperature Control and Monitoring
      Risk Assessment Form
      Cooler Temperature Log
      Thermometer Calibration Log
      Employee Training Log
      Final Product Transport
      Transport Vehicle Inspection Log/Checklist
      Equipment Inspection Form
      Refrigerated Vehicle Temperature Monitoring
      Employee Training Log

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Fig. Nancy Flores, Extension Food Technology Specialist, Department of Extension Family and Consumer Sciences, NMSU.


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Printed and electronically distributed February 2013, Las Cruces, NM.