NMSU: In a Pinch Food Yields
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In a Pinch Food Yields


Guide E-132
Martha Archuleta, Food and Nutrition Specialist
College of Agriculture, Consumer and Environmental Sciences New Mexico State University.


Can You Answer the Following Questions?

  • How many cups of grated cheese are in a onepound block?
  • If a recipe calls for three cups of cooked rice, how many cups of uncooked rice should be prepared?
  • How many cups of nutmeats are in a one-pound package?

These and many more questions can be answered by this handy chart on food yields. Keep it nearby when preparing a meal or making out your shopping list. It’s a real timesaver!

Note that the following yields are only approximations, because preparation techniques and the condition of fresh food vary greatly.

Yield Equivalencies

Food This Much Equals This Much
apples 1 pound (3 medium) 2 3/4–3 cups sliced
bacon 8 slices 1/2 cup crumbled
bananas 1 pound (3 medium) 2 1/2 cups sliced,
2 cups mashed
barley
• regular
• quick

1 cup, uncooked
1 cup, uncooked

4 cups cooked
3 cups cooked
beans, dry 1 cup, uncooked 3 cups cooked
bread crumbs 1 slice, dry
1 slice, soft
1/4–1/3 cup crumbs
1/2–3/4 cup crumbs
cabbage
shredded
1 pound 3 1/2–4 1/2 cups
candied fruit or peels 1/2 pound 1-1/4 cups cut up
cheese
• american
• cheddar
• mozzarella

1 pound
1 pound
1 oz

4–5 cups shredded
4 cups shredded
1/4 cup shredded
coconut,
flaked or shredded
1 pound 5 cups
chocolate
• morsels or chips
• cocoa
• chocolate

6-oz package
1 pound
1/2 pound

1 cup
4 cups
8 (1-oz. ea) squares
unsweetened
coffee 1 pound 40–50 servings
cornmeal 1 pound
1 cup uncooked
3 cups dry
4 cups cooked mush
crackers
• graham
• soda

10 crackers
16 crackers
22 crackers

1 cup fine crumbs
1 cup coarse crumbs
1 cup fine crumbs
cranberries,
fresh uncooked
1 pound 4 cups
cream,
heavy whipping
1 cup (1/2 pint) 2 cups whipped
dates,
pitted and cut up
1 pound 2-1/2 cups
fat
• butter or margarine
• solid
• butter, whipped
• oils
• shortening

1 pound (4 sticks)
1/4 pound (1 stick)
1 pound
1 quart
1 pound

2 cups
1/2 cup or 8 Tbsp
3 cups
4 cups
2 1/2 cups
figs,
dried and cut fine
1 pound 2 2/3 cups
flour
• corn
• gluten, sifted
• rice
   -sifted
   -stirred, spooned
• rye
   -light, sifted
   -dark, sifted
• soy
   -full-fat, sifted
   -low-fat
• wheat
   -all-purpose, sifted
   -all-purpose, sifted
   -unsifted, spooned
   -bread, sifted
   -cake, sifted
   -cake, spooned
   -pastry, sifted
   -self-rising, sifted
   -whole-wheat, stirred

2 pounds
2 pounds
2 pounds


2 pounds


2 pounds



5 pounds
2 pounds
2 pounds
2 pounds
2 pounds
2 pounds
2 pounds
2 pounds
2 pounds

8 cups
6 1/2 cups

7 cups
5 3/4 cups

10 cups
7 cups

15 cups
11 cups

20 cups
8 cups
7 cups
8 cups
9 1/4 cups
8 1/4 cups
9 cups
8 cups
6 2/3 cups
marshmallows
• standard size
• miniature

1 pound
1 pound

4 cups
13 1/2 cups
nuts
• almonds
   -in shell
   -shelled
• english walnuts
   -in shell
   -shelled

• filberts
   -in shell
   -shelled
• peanuts
   -in shell
   -shelled
• pecans
   -in shell
   -shelled


1 pound
1 pound

1 pound
1 pound


1 pound
1 pound

1 pound
1 pound

1 pound
1 pound


1–1 3/4 cups nutmeats
3 cups blanched whole

1 2/3 cups nutmeats
4 1/2 cups halves
3 2/3 cups chopped

1 1/2 cups nutmeats
3 1/4–3 1/2 cups nutmeats

2–2 1/4 cups nut meats
3–3 1/4 cups nut meats

2 1/4 cups nut meats
4–4 1/2 cups halves
3–3 3/4 cups chopped
oats, rolled 1 cup uncooked
1 ounce uncooked
1 3/4 cups cooked
1/3 cup uncooked
onion 1 small
1 medium
1 large
1/4 cup chopped
1/2 cup chopped
1 cup chopped
pasta
• macaroni

• noodles
• spaghetti, 2-in. pieces

1 pound
1 cup uncooked
1 cup uncooked
1 pound

4 cups, uncooked
2–2 1/4 cups cooked
1 3/4 cups cooked
4 3/4 cups uncooked
9–10 cups cooked
popcorn 1/4 cup kernels
1/3 cup kernels
8 cups popcorn
12 cups popcorn
potatoes 1 pound
diced or sliced
1 1/2–2 1/4 cups cooked
white (3 medium) 1 3/4–2 cups mashed
prunes, dried,
whole and pitted
1 pound 2 1/4 cups
raisins 15 oz. package
1 pound
3 cups
3 1/4 cups
rice
• regular
• minute

1 cup uncooked
3/4 cup uncooked

3 cups cooked
1 1/3 cups cooked
shrimp, fresh
3/4 pound raw in shell
(1) 7 oz. packed frozen peeled,
     cooked
(1) 4 1/2 or 5 oz. can
1 cup cooked and cleaned
sugar
• brown
• confectioners’,
   unsifted
• granulated

1 pound
1 pound

1 pound
5 pounds

2 1/4 cups firmly packed
3–4 cups

2 1/4 cups
11 1/4 cups
tea, loose 1 pound 200 cups
tomatoes 1 pound
(3 medium)
1 1/2 cups chopped
3/4 cup sliced
zucchini 1 medium
(5–6 oz)
1 cup loosely packed,
grated

Common Can Sizes

Can Size Weight Cups Products
8 oz. 8 oz 1 Fruits, vegetables, specialties for small families.
Picnic 10 1/2–12 oz 1 1/4 Mainly condensed soups. Some fruits, vegetables,
meat, fish, specialties.
12 oz vacuum 12 oz 1 1/2 Mainly for vacuum-packed corn.
No. 300 14–16 oz 1 3/4 Pork and beans, baked beans, meat products,
cranberry sauce, blueberries, specialties.
No. 303 16–17 oz.
(1 lb–1 lb 1 oz)
2 Principal size for fruits and vegetables. Also some
meat products, ready-to-serve soups, specialties.
No. 2 20 oz.
(1 lb 4 oz)
or 18 fl oz
(1 pt 2 fl oz)
2 1/2 Juices, ready-to-serve soups, some specialties,
pineapple, apple slices.
No longer in popular use for most fruits and
vegetables.
No. 2 1/2 27–29 oz.
(1 lb 11 oz–
1 lb 13 oz)
3 1/2 Fruits, some vegetables (pumpkin, sauerkraut,
spinach and other greens, tomatoes).
No. 3 cylinder
or 46 fl. oz
51 oz.
(3 lb 3 oz) or
46 fl oz
(1 qt 14 fl. oz)
5 3/4 Fruit and vegetable juices, pork and beans.
Institutional size for condensed soups, some
vegetables
No. 10 6-1/2 lb
to 7 lb, 5 oz
12–13 Institutional size for fruits, vegetables, and some
other foods.

Oven Temperatures

If your treasured family recipe describes oven temperatures as slow, moderate or hot, this quick reference chart will help you decide what temperature to set your oven.

Oven Description Temperature in Degrees
very slow oven 250°–275°F
slow oven 300°–325°F
moderate oven 350°–375°F
hot oven 400°–425°F
very hot oven 450°–475°F
extremely hot oven 500°–525°F

Baking Pan Sizes

Pan size Batter Amount
rectangular cake pans
• 8 × 8 × 2 in deep
• 9 × 9 × 1 1/2 in deep
• 9 × 9 × 2 in deep
• 13 × 9 × 2 in deep

6 cups batter
8 cups batter
10 cups batter
14 cups batter
round cake pans
• 8 × 1 1/2 in deep
• 9 × 1 1/2 in deep

4 cups batter
6 cups batter
pie plates
• 8 × 1 1/4 in deep

• 9 × 1/2 in deep

3 cups filling to be level with top;
4–4 1/2 cups filling, mounded
4 cups filling to be level with top;
5–6 cups filling, mounded
loaf pans
• 8 1/2 × 4 1/2 × 2 1/2 in deep
• 9 × 5 × 3 in deep

6 cups batter
8 cups batter

Equivalent Measures

This Much Equals This Much
1 gallon 4 quarts
1 quart 2 pints
1 pint 2 cups
8 quarts 1 peck
4 pecks 1 bushel
1 cup 16 tablespoons
7/8 cup 14 tablespoons
3/4 cup 12 tablespoons
2/3 cup 10 2/3 tablespoons
5/8 cup 10 tablespoons
1/2 cup 8 tablespoons
3/8 cup 6 tablespoons
1/3 cup 5 1/3 tablespoons
1/4 cup 4 tablespoons
1/8 cup 2 tablespoons
1/16 cup 1 tablespoon
1 tablespoon 3 teaspoons
7/8 tablespoon 2 1/2 teaspoons
3/4 tablespoon 2 1/4 teaspoons
2/3 tablespoon 2 teaspoons
5/8 tablespoon 1 7/8 teaspoons
1/2 tablespoon 1 1/2 teaspoons
3/8 tablespoon 1 1/8 teaspoons
1/3 tablespoon 1 teaspoon
1/4 tablespoon 3/4 teaspoon

Hints

  • One tablespoon of unflavored gelatin gels about two cups of liquid.

  • For accurate measuring, use standard measuring spoons and cups. Household cups and spoons often hold more or less than the standard measure. Recipe failures are often caused by measuring ingredients in non-standard containers.

  • If brown or powdered sugar is lumpy, press it through a sieve before adding to your product.

  • For ease in measuring honey, measure shortening or oil first. Then measure honey in the same cup—every drop will slip right out!

  • All measurements should be level. For dry ingredients, use a cup with a measure flush with the rim. Spoon in dry ingredients and level with a knife or spatula. Don’t shake down or hit the cup because dry ingredients will pack down.

  • Sifting salt, leavening, and spices with the flour ensures even distribution.

  • Whole wheat flour cannot be sifted. Instead, it should be stirred before measuring.

  • Fresh cranberries can easily be chopped in a blender if they are frozen first.

This publication was originally adapted by Alice Jane Hendley.


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New Mexico State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer and educator. NMSU and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating.

Revised and electronically distributed January 2003, Las Cruces, NM.