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Educating tomorrow's leaders in ranch management, today.

May 31-June 5, 2015

Date Subject to Change

Valles Caldera National Preserve

Youth 15-19 Years of Age

Online Application available after March 1, 2015

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Nationally, the average age in the ranching community continues to increase as more young people are opting to leave the ranch for careers outside production agriculture. As a result, the fabric of rural economies, as well as the ranching tradition and cultures, are in jeopardy.

In a rural state like New Mexico, the situation has significant implications. The NM Youth Ranch Management Camp is an effort to reverse the aging trend in ranching by incorporating a hands-on educational approach to youth of New Mexico.

2014 NM Youth Ranch Management Camp Participants
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Each day, a great deal of expertise presents information to camp participants; from college professors, extension specialists and agents, to industry professionals.

The program is designed for 15-19 year old New Mexico youth and is limited in the number of youth selected to participate in this prestigious camp. Applications are evaluated by a select panel consisting of committee members, industry professionals and allied partners. Thirty of the top applicants are invited to attend this unique, learning experience at the Valles Caldera.

"The ranch camp is a tremendous opportunity for high school youth and is the first of its kind across states I have been involved with," said Dennis Braden, general manager of Swenson Land and Cattle Co. in Stamford, Texas, and camp volunteer and presenter.

"What the kids learned at the ranch camp has a direct impact on the quality of beef produced for future generations," said Dina Chacon-Reitzel, executive director of the NM Beef Council. The council was one of the many industry organizations and companies that helped sponsor the camp.

"Participants will leave this experience with a greater appreciation for not only new skills and practices, but also the economics of each practice as it relates to cash flow for a ranch in the Southwest," said Jack Blandford, Luna County Extension agricultural agent.